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What are some risk factors for bedsores?

On Behalf of | Jan 18, 2022 | Nursing Home Abuse

Many nursing home residents stay put in a wheelchair or a bed for long periods of time, which exposes them to the risk of bedsores. Nursing home staff should do their part to move or shift residents to prevent constant pressure on the skin from manifesting pressure ulcers. Medical News Today explains other factors that may contribute to the creation of bedsores.

Sometimes it is possible to mitigate risk factors, other times not. Nonetheless, they are important to be aware of so you know whether an elderly loved one is at special risk of bedsore.

Incontinence

Many seniors struggle with incontinence, so if your parent has issues using the toilet, this is something to pay attention to. Incontinence exposes a person to a greater risk of skin damage and possibly infection. This could lead to a bedsore or another infection like a UTI.

Extremes in body weight

Older age thins the skin, so growing older already boosts the risk of a pressure ulcer. This is why your loved one should have a healthy body weight. A person who is too thin loses padding around the bones. However, a person with a high body mass index may also experience a greater chance of a bedsore because of the added pressure produced by the body mass.

Complications from diabetes

The effects of diabetes can leave a person more vulnerable to a bedsore. For one thing, diabetes makes it harder to feel pain. If your parent has diabetes, he or she may have issues feeling friction or pressure against the skin. Also, diabetes slows down the body’s ability to heal wounds, which may cause a bedsore to develop.

Other risk factors

Older people may also see a higher risk of bedsores if they suffer from blood circulation problems or have cognitive impairment. Not enough nutrition or a lack of proper skin care may also cause problems. This is why it is important to pay attention to your loved one’s care so that no deficiencies in care contribute to a bedsore.